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Gendered Lives: Global Issues

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A gender studies textbook that takes an anthropological approach.

Gendered Lives takes a regional approach to examine gender issues from an anthropological perspective with a focus on globalization and intersectionality. Chapters present contributors’ ethnographic research, contextualizing their findings within four geographic regions: Latin America, the Caribbean, South Asia, and the Global North. Each regional section begins with an overview of the broader historical, social, and gendered contexts, which situate the regions within larger global linkages. These introductions also feature short project/people profiles that highlight the work of community leaders or non-governmental organizations active in gender-related issues. Each research-based chapter begins with a chapter overview and learning objectives and closes with discussion questions and resources for further exploration. This modular, regional approach allows instructors to select the regions and cases they want to use in their courses. While they can be used separately, the chapters are connected through the book’s central themes of globalization and intersectionality.

Provide feedback or request a test bank at the book’s webpage: https://genderedlives.americananthro.org/

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Part I: Introduction

Chapter 1: Key Concepts

Katie Nelson and Nadine T. Fernandez

Chapter 2: Key Perspectives

Nadine T. Fernandez and Katie Nelson

Part II: South Asia

Part III: Latin America

Chapter 7: Latin America: Introducing the Region

Ana Marina Tzul Tzul and Serena Cosgrove

Part IV: The Caribbean

Part V: The Global North (North America and Europe)



Nadine T. Fernandez

Dr. Nadine T. Fernandez is a cultural anthropologist and professor in the Social Science & Public Affairs Department at SUNY Empire State College. She has BA in Urban Studies and History from the University of Pennsylvania, and a Masters and PhD in Cultural Anthropology from the University of California, Berkeley.  She has over 20 years of experience teaching traditional and non-traditional students in the classroom and online, and has recently begun creating and using Open Educational Resources (OERs) in her courses.  Her research examines migration, race and gender relations in Cuba. In 2015 she received the SUNY Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Scholarship and Creative Activities. Her publications include: Revolutionizing Romance: interracial couples in contemporary Cuba (Rutgers University Press 2010); an edited book (with Christian Groes) Intimate Mobilities: sexual economies, marriage and migration in a disparate world (Berghahn Books 2018); and several book chapters and journal articles.

Katie Nelson

Katie Nelson is an instructor of anthropology at Inver Hills Community College. Her research focuses on identity, belonging and citizenship(s) among migrant and undocumented populations in the U.S., Mexico and Morocco. She is particularly interested in examining how migrants forge a sense of identity and belonging in the contexts of national discourses that problematize their presence.

She received her BA in Anthropology and Latin American Studies from Macalester College, her MA in Anthropology from the University of California, Santa Barbara, an MA in Education and Instructional Technology from the University of Saint Thomas and her Ph.D. in socio-cultural anthropology from CIESAS Occidente, Guadalajara, Mexico.

Dr. Nelson serves as the Online Content Editor for the Teaching and Learning Anthropology Journal. She is also a managing editor for Explorations: An Open Invitation to Biological Anthropology, a forthcoming open access textbook. She recently authored a chapter in Perspectives: An Open Access to Cultural Anthropology, an open access textbook.