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DC Electrical Circuit Analysis: A Practical Approach + Lab Manual

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A practical and thorough treatment of DC circuit analysis, this text begins with coverage of scientific and engineering notation along with the metric system. Also included is a discussion of the scientific method – the basis of our modern system of investigation and technology. From there, basic concepts and quantities are introduced such as charge, current, energy, power and voltage. Subsequent chapters introduce resistance, series circuits, parallel circuits and series-parallel circuits. The text continues with chapters covering analysis techniques such as superposition, source conversions, mesh analysis, nodal analysis, Thévenin’s and Norton’s theorems, and delta-wye conversions; plus dependent sources, and an introduction to capacitors and inductors. RL and RC circuits are included for DC initial and steady state response along with transient response. The text also features over 500 end-of-chapter problems. A companion text covering AC circuit analysis picks up where this one leaves off.

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Chapter 1: Fundamentals

  • 1.0 Chapter Objectives
  • 1.1 Introduction
  • 1.2 Significant Digits and Resolution
  • 1.3 Scientific and Engineering Notation
  • 1.4 The Metric System
  • 1.5 The Scientific Method
  • 1.6 Critical Thinking
  • 1.7 RoHS
  • Summary
  • Exercises

Chapter 2: Basic Quantities

  • 2.0 Chapter Objectives
  • 2.1 Introduction
  • 2.2 An Atomic Model
  • 2.3 Charge and Current
  • 2.4 Energy and Voltage
  • 2.5 Power and Efficiency
  • 2.6 Energy Cost and Battery Life
  • 2.7 Resistance and Conductance
  • 2.8 Instrumentation and Laboratory
  • Summary
  • Exercises

Chapter 3: Series Resistive Circuits

  • 3.0 Chapter Objectives
  • 3.1 Introduction
  • 3.2 Conventional Current Flow and Electron Flow
  • 3.3 The Series Connection
  • 3.4 Combining Series Components
  • 3.5 Ohm’s Law
  • 3.6 Kirchhoff’s Voltage Law
  • 3.7 Series Analysis
  • 3.8 Potentiometers and Rheostats
  • Summary
  • Exercises

 

Chapter 4: Parallel Resistive Circuits

  • 4.0 Chapter Objectives
  • 4.1 Introduction
  • 4.2 The Parallel Connection
  • 4.3 Combining Parallel Components
  • 4.4 Kirchhoff’s Current Law
  • 4.5 Parallel Analysis
  • 4.6 Current Limiting: Fuses and Circuit Breakers
  • Summary
  • Exercises

Chapter 5: Series-Parallel Resistive Circuits

  • 5.0 Chapter Objectives
  • 5.1 Introduction
  • 5.2 Series-Parallel Connections
  • 5.3 Simplifying Series-Parallel Components
  • 5.4 Series-Parallel Analysis
  • Summary
  • Exercises

Chapter 6: Analysis Theorems and Techniques

  • 6.0 Chapter Objectives
  • 6.1 Introduction
  • 6.2 Source Conversions
  • 6.3 Superposition Theorem
  • 6.4 Thévenin’s Theorem
  • 6.5 Norton’s Theorem
  • 6.6 Maximum Power Transfer Theorem
  • 6.7 Delta-Y Conversions
  • Summary
  • Exercises

Chapter 7: Nodal & Mesh Analysis, Dependent Sources

  • 7.0 Chapter Objectives
  • 7.1 Introduction
  • 7.2 Nodal Analysis
  • 7.3 Mesh Analysis
  • 7.4 Dependent Sources
  • Summary
  • Exercises

Chapter 8: Capacitors

  • 8.0 Chapter Objectives
  • 8.1 Introduction
  • 8.2 Capacitance and Capacitors
  • 8.3 Initial and Steady-State Analysis of RC Circuits
  • 8.4 Transient Response of RC Circuits
  • Summary
  • Exercises

Chapter 9: Inductors

  • 9.0 Chapter Objectives
  • 9.1 Introduction
  • 9.2 Inductance and Inductors
  • 9.3 Initial and Steady-State Analysis of RL Circuits
  • 9.4 Initial and Steady-State Analysis of RLC Circuits
  • 9.5 Transient Response of RL Circuits
  • Summary
  • Exercises

Chapter 10: Magnetic Circuits and Transformers

  • 10.0 Chapter Objectives
  • 10.1 Introduction
  • 10.2 Electromagnetic Induction.
  • 10.3 Magnetic Circuits
  • 10.4 Transformers
  • Summary
  • Exercises

Appendices

A: Standard Component Sizes
B: Methods of Solution of Linear Simultaneous Equations
C: Equation Proofs
D: Answers to Selected Odd-Numbered Problems
E: Base Units
F: Appropriate Commentary



James Fiore

James Fiore is a professor of Electrical Engineering Technology at Mohawk Valley Community College in Utica, NY. He has over 35 years of teaching and course development experience in ABET accredited electrical engineering technology programs. He is the author of several OER texts and laboratory manuals along with dozens of articles in trade journals and technical magazines covering the areas of electronic design, programming and electronic music production. Professor Fiore is a recipient of the 2015 SUNY Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Scholarship, the 2014 MVCC Award for Excellence in Scholarship, and the 2013 MVCC Aeries Award for community service. He is an advocate for OER and author/artist rights. Professor Fiore maintains web pages at the MVCC web site that include links to the latest versions of all of his OER titles in both pdf and odt formats at http://www2.mvcc.edu/users/faculty/jfiore/freebooks.html

He also maintains a mirror at his own site http://www.dissidents.com